Countries Have Laws that Ban or Restrict Vaping or e-Cigarette Smoking

Countries Have Laws that Ban or Restrict Vaping or e-Cigarette Smoking

While legislators in most countries are still grappling with recommendations and resolutions on how to regulate e-cigarette smoking or vaping, an estimated total of 40 countries have already instituted and implemented related policies. These countries may yet change their stance, since most current bans ànd restrictions are mainly in accordance with the recommendations of the World Health Organisation (WHO). That is, for governments to take a cautious approach to formulating policies that allow vaping or e-cigarette smoking.

Vaping has become widely popular as alternative to cigarette smoking during the past years; prompting the WHO to publish its own position regarding vaping and the issues to consider by countries when formulating policies.

WHO Gives Advice to Take Caution in Formulating Laws Governing e-Cigarettes

The WHO contends that vaping is no different from conventional cigarette smoking since both products contain nicotine, which is the very substance that poses as health risks to both smokers and passive smokers. E-cigarettes via Electronic Nicotine Delivery System or (ENDS) merely modifies the delivery of nicotine by vaporizing liquid.

The organization further argues that epidemiological studies have yet to be conducted, providing solid evidence on which to draw conclusions that vaping by way of ENDS is a healthier alternative to conventional cigarette smoking.

Citing the contributions submitted by over a hundred scientists and regulators, the WHO highlights conclusive evidence that the health risks lies on the toxicity of nicotine contents of both products, with which non-smokers can also be affected by second-hand smoke or vapor emissions.

Why Other Countries Have Yet to Implement Policies Pertaining to Vaping

In countries where politics have a major influence on how and what laws must be imposed, other issues such as taxation and political ideologies are still being taken into consideration. After all, taxes on tobacco sales, particularly on cigarettes, represent a substantial portion of government revenues.

While other governments consider including e-cigarettes in their tobacco taxation, other countries allow vaping but only in places where children are not present. EU member countries that allow vaping take particular attention to European Tobacco Products Directive (EUTPD) limiting nicotine strength to 20% and size of e-liquids to 10ml capacity, whilst requiring cartridges and clearomisers to a capacity not exceeding 2ml.